Spicy Turmeric-Flavored Grated Carrots

There are more than five hundred million vegetarians in India, where cooks reflect regional standards and tradition to create harmony and balance in making body, mind, and spirit happy using flavor-enhancing spices like coriander, cumin, and turmeric.  In villages many still embrace a diet similar to their ancient ancestors, where small, tender seasonal vegetables are preferred to larger ones because they are easy-to-digest and nutritious.  A vegetarian meal generally consists of rice or roti, vegetables, legumes, chutney or relish, pickle, salad, and plain yogurt, followed perhaps with a sweet dessert or seasonal fruits.  A dry vegetable dish is usually served with a liquid legume accompaniment, such as a dal.  Sometimes for lunch, I have a spicy turmeric-flavored grated carrot sandwich and a small bowl of lentils (dal).

Chili Flavored Grated carrots

Spicy Turmeric-Flavored Grated Carrots (Gajar ka Sabzi)

Serves 6

2 pounds fresh carrots, grated
¼  cup corn oil
½ teaspoon black mustard seeds
½ teaspoon cumin seeds
½ teaspoon split black beans (urid dal) – optional
1 medium onion, peeled and chopped fine
8 cloves garlic, peeled and chopped fine
1-inch piece fresh gingerroot, peeled and chopped fine
1 green chili, chopped fine
2 sprigs fresh curry leaves
½ teaspoon turmeric powder
½ teaspoon coriander powder
½ teaspoon cumin powder
¼ teaspoon asafoetida powder
Salt to taste

Heat the oil in a wok over medium heat.  Add the mustard seeds, cumin seeds, and split black beans and sauté for 2-3 minutes, stirring constantly, until they change color and the mustard seeds start popping.

Add the onions, garlic, ginger, chili, and curry leaves and sauté for 3-4 minutes, stirring occasionally, until onions turn soft and golden brown.

Add the turmeric, coriander, cumin and asafoetida and stir thoroughly for 2-3 minutes.  Add the grated carrots and salt and mix thoroughly.  Cover and simmer for 5-6 minutes, stirring occasionally to prevent ingredients from sticking to the bottom of the wok.

Serve hot with plain Basmati rice or roti, legumes, yogurt salad (raita), and sweet cilantro chutney.

 

Front_Cover_3_28_2016FOI_AG_Front Cover

Let’s Curry!  Share my healthy repertoire of authentic, delicious, and easy-to-prepare vegetarian and non-vegetarian recipes of diverse flavors with family and friends from Feast of India: A Legacy of Recipes and Fables (1991, 2015) and India’s Unsurpassed Cuisine: The Art of Indian Curry Cooking (Editor’s Choice, 2016) at www.feastofindia.net.

 

Turmeric-flavored Lentils with Tomato & Cilantro (Dal)

Highly nutritious and extremely rich in protein and potassium, legumes or dried beans and peas (dals)  are  part of the culinary traditions of many countries.  Easily digested, they contain enzymes, fiber, minerals, and vitamins and is an accompaniment of almost every Indian lunch.  The repertoire of dal dishes is indeed extensive, from liquid soups and thick purees, stews, fried appetizers, crispy pancakes and crepes, sauces, and chutneys to sprouted salads and delicious sweetmeats.  

Always wash legumes four or five times under cold running water prior to cooking.  Some varieties of legumes should be soaked overnight to tenderize and save cooking time.  Dal is always prepared in combination with pungent herbs and spices, such as garlic, ginger, onion, black pepper, chilies, mustard seeds, asafoetida, cumin, coriander, turmeric, fenugreek seeds, onion seeds, salt, and oil or clarified butter to enhance digestion.

The seasoning technique (baghar or tarka) is always the same.

Coriander Flavored Lentils

Turmeric-Flavored Lentils with Tomato & Cilantro (Dal)

Serves 6

1 pound pink lentils, soaked in cold water for 10 minutes
2 quarts water
½ teaspoon turmeric powder
Salt to taste
¼ cup corn oil
½ teaspoon cumin seeds
½ teaspoon black mustard seeds
1 red dried chili
2 medium chopped onions, peeled and chopped fine
6 cloves garlic, peeled and chopped fine
½ -inch piece fresh gingerroot, peeled and chopped fine
¼ teaspoon asafoetida
2 medium tomatoes, chopped
¼ cup fresh cilantro leaves, chopped fine

Wash the lentils.  In a large pot, add water, lentils, turmeric, and salt.  Cover and boil over medium heat, stirring occasionally for 30 minutes until lentils are tender.  Heat the oil in a wok over high heat.  Add cumin, mustard seeds and red chili, stirring over medium heat until seeds start popping and chili turns a shade darker.  Add onions, garlic, and ginger, stirring occasionally until golden brown.  Add asafoetida and mix thoroughly for a few seconds.  Add lentils and tomato and mix thoroughly.  Cover and cook for 5-6 minutes.  Add cilantro leaves and serve hot with plain Basmati rice, roti or crackers.

 

FOI_AG_Front CoverFront_Cover_3_28_2016

Let’s Curry!  Share my healthy repertoire of delicious and easy-to-prepare recipes with family and friends from Feast of India: A Legacy of Recipes and Fables (1991, 2015) and India’s Unsurpassed Cuisine: The Art of Indian Curry Cooking (Editor’s Choice, 2016) at www.feastofindia.net.

Mouth-watering Chicken Curry

Prepare this mouth-watering chicken curry with rice for family and friends!

Chicken Curry with Potatoes

(Murgh-Aloo Korma)

Serves 6

2½ pounds chicken pieces
¾ cup plain yogurt
¾-inch piece fresh gingerroot, peeled and chopped
8 cloves garlic, peeled and chopped
1 large onion, peeled and chopped
½ teaspoon chili powder
¾ teaspoon ground turmeric
Salt to taste
1 tablespoon curry powder
4 medium potatoes, peeled and cut into 1-inch pieces
¾ cup corn oil
7 green cardamom pods
2 black cardamom pods
2 cinnamon sticks
2 bay leaves
6 cloves
3 cups water
½ cup fresh cilantro leaves, chopped fine

Remove the skin and fat from the chicken, wash and drain the chicken, and set aside in a large bowl.

In a food processor, puree the yogurt, ginger, garlic, onion, chili powder, turmeric, curry powder, and salt.

Combine the yogurt mixture with the chicken. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate for 2 hours.

Wash the potatoes and drain.

Heat the oil in a wok over high heat and sauté the cardamom, cinnamon, bay leaves, and cloves for 1–2 minutes, stirring constantly, until the spices change color to a darker shade.

Reduce the heat to medium, add the chicken and marinade, and stir for 5 minutes until boiling.

Add 3 cups water and mix thoroughly. Cover and cook for 25 minutes, stirring occasionally to prevent ingredients from sticking, until chicken is tender.

Add the potatoes and mix. Cover and simmer for 7–8 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the potatoes are tender.

Garnish with fresh cilantro leaves and serve hot with plain Basmati rice or roti, vegetables, legumes, and tossed salad.

 

FOI_AG_Front CoverFront_Cover_3_28_2016

Let’s Curry!  Share a healthy repertoire of authentic, delicious, and easy-to-prepare recipes of diverse flavors with family and friends from Feast of India: A Legacy of Recipes and Fables (1991, 2015) and India’s Unsurpassed Cuisine: The Art of Indian Curry Cooking (Editor’s Choice, 2016) at www.feastofindia.net.

What is a Curry?

A curry is basically a casserole of vegetables, chicken, fish, lamb, or ground meat cooked in a masala ( a combination of several spices in a paste).  Garam-masala literally means ‘hot spice,’ and it is made by roasting and grinding a variety of dried spices to achieve different flavorings.  The basic art of Indian cooking lies in the careful blending of different spices to yield subtle variations in the flavor of foods.  The khansamas, or chefs, of India have always been true alchemists, capable of  mixing myriad spices that intensify the flavors of almost every kind of food.

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There are three very simple, yet extremely important steps to remember when roasting spices for a curry power, paste, or masala:

  1.  Constantly stir the spices as they roast to avoid burning them.
  2.  Spices have roasted once they become a shade darker than their original color.
  3.  As spices become roasted and change color, they will give out a distinct aroma, and the pan being used will emit light fumes of smoke.

To derive the exact flavoring desired, roast spices over medium heat for three to four minutes – no more, or the spices will burn.

Curry powders and dry masala blends retain their flavor for up to six months when stored in airtight jars.  Pastes must be stored in the refrigerator in airtight containers, and they retain their flavor for about one month.

Spice Powder for Vegetables (Sabzi Masala)

4 tablespoons coriander seeds
4 tablespoons cumin seeds
1 teaspoon dry ginger
2 dried red chilies
1 tablespoon ground turmeric

After roasting, grind to a fine powder and store in an airtight container.

 

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Let’s Curry!  Share my healthy repertoire of authentic, delicious, and easy-to-prepare recipes of diverse flavors with family and friends from Feast of India: A Legacy of Recipes and Fables (1991, 2015) and India’s Unsurpassed Cuisine: The Art of Indian Curry Cooking (Editor’s Choice, 2016) at www.feastofindia.net.

Delicious Cream of Wheat

Ever so popular in South Indian homes and restaurants, upuma is simple to make and is served for breakfast, lunch, tea, and dinner with coconut chutney and spicy lentils (sambar) or cilantro flavored tomato chutney.  Use coarse semolina to prepare this delicious, healthy meal and add your favorite vegetables such as bell peppers, carrots, or peas!

South Indian Upma

Cream of Wheat (Upuma)

Serves 6

1 pound coarse semolina
¼ cup corn oil
½ teaspoon black mustard seeds
1 tablespoon split black beans (urid dal)
½  cup raw, unsalted cashew nut pieces
2 medium onions, peeled and chopped fine
¾-inch piece fresh gingerroot, peeled and chopped fine
2 small green chilies, chopped fine
¼ teaspoon asafoetida
Salt to taste
4 cups hot water
2 tablespoons clarified butter (ghee)
¼ cup fresh cilantro leaves, chopped fine

Heat the wok over high heat.  Add the cream of wheat and roast over medium heat, stirring constantly as it changes color to a light golden brown.  Transfer to a pan and set aside.

Heat the oil in the wok over high heat.  Add mustard seeds and sauté over medium heat for 2-3 minutes until the seeds start popping.  Add black beans and cashew nuts and sauté for 2-3 minutes until they turn golden brown.  Add onion, ginger and green chili and stir thoroughly for 3-4 minutes until the onions turn soft and golden brown.  Add  asafoetida and mix thoroughly for a few seconds.

Add roasted cream of wheat and salt and stir thoroughly for 2-3 minutes.  Stir in hot water and mix thoroughly for 2-3 minutes until cream of wheat is cooked and most of the water has evaporated.  Add clarified butter and cilantro leaves and stir thoroughly.  Remove and serve  with tomato chutney or lentils and eggplant.

 

FOI_AG_Front CoverFront_Cover_3_28_2016

Let’s Curry!  Discover and share a healthy repertoire of delicious, and easy-to-prepare recipes of diverse flavors with family and friends from Feast of India: A Legacy of Recipes and Fables (1991, 2015) and India’s Unsurpassed Cuisine: The Art of Indian Curry Cooking (Editor’s Choice, 2016) at www.feastofindia.net.

 

 

Turmeric-Flavored Grated Carrots

The fourteenth-century Moroccan traveler and diplomat Ibn Baṭūṭah (1304-1377), in his history Travels (Rehla) described the diet of the people of India as being very dainty with a hundred different ways of cooking their food, which they varied every day.  A vegetarian meal generally consists of rice or roti, vegetables, legumes, chutney or relish, pickle, salad, and plain yogurt, followed perhaps with a sweet dessert or seasonal fruits.  A dry vegetable dish is usually served with a liquid legume accompaniment, such as a dal.

There are more than five hundred million vegetarians in India, where cooks reflect regional standards and tradition to create harmony and balance in making body, mind, and spirit happy using flavor-enhancing spices like coriander, cumin, and turmeric.  In villages many still embrace a diet similar to their ancient ancestors, where small, tender seasonal vegetables are preferred to larger ones because they are easy-to-digest and nutritious.

Chili Flavored Grated carrots

Turmeric-Flavored Grated Carrots (Gajar ka Sabzi)

Serves 6

2 pounds fresh carrots, grated
¼  cup corn oil
½ teaspoon black mustard seeds
½ teaspoon cumin seeds
½ teaspoon split black beans (urid dal) – optional
1 medium onion, peeled and chopped fine
8 cloves garlic, peeled and chopped fine
1-inch piece fresh gingerroot, peeled and chopped fine
1 green chili, chopped fine
2 sprigs fresh curry leaves
½ teaspoon turmeric powder
½ teaspoon coriander powder
½ teaspoon cumin powder
Salt to taste

Heat the oil in a wok over medium heat.  Add the mustard seeds, cumin seeds, and split black beans and sauté for 2-3 minutes, stirring constantly, until they change color and the mustard seeds start popping.

Add the onions, garlic, ginger, chili, and curry leaves and sauté for 3-4 minutes, stirring occasionally, until onions turn soft and golden brown.

Add the turmeric, coriander, and cumin, and stir thoroughly for 2-3 minutes.  Add the grated carrots and salt and mix thoroughly.  Cover and simmer for 5-6 minutes, stirring occasionally to prevent ingredients from sticking to the bottom of the wok.

Serve hot with plain Basmati rice or roti, legumes, yogurt salad (raita), and sweet cilantro chutney.

 

Front_Cover_3_28_2016FOI_AG_Front Cover

Let’s Curry!  Share my healthy repertoire of authentic, delicious, and easy-to-prepare vegetarian and non-vegetarian recipes of diverse flavors with family and friends from Feast of India: A Legacy of Recipes and Fables (1991, 2015) and India’s Unsurpassed Cuisine: The Art of Indian Curry Cooking (Editor’s Choice, 2016) at www.feastofindia.net.

 

 

Turmeric Lentils with Tomato & Cilantro

Highly nutritious and extremely rich in protein and potassium, legumes or dried beans and peas (dals)  are  part of the culinary traditions of many countries.  They are easily digested and contain enzymes, fiber, minerals, and vitamins and is an accompaniment of almost every Indian lunch.  The repertoire of dal dishes is indeed extensive, from liquid soups and thick purees, stews, fried appetizers, crispy pancakes and crepes, sauces, and chutneys to sprouted salads and delicious sweetmeats.  

Always wash legumes four or five times under cold running water prior to cooking.  Some varieties of legumes should be soaked overnight to tenderize and save cooking time.  Dal is always prepared in combination with pungent herbs and spices, such as garlic, ginger, onion, black pepper, chilies, mustard seeds, asafoetida, cumin, coriander, turmeric, fenugreek seeds, onion seeds, salt, and oil or clarified butter to enhance digestion.

Coriander Flavored Lentils

The seasoning technique (baghar or tarka) is always the same.

Turmeric Lentils with Tomato & Cilantro (Dal)

Serves 6

1 pound pink lentils, soaked in cold water for 10 minutes
2 quarts water
½ teaspoon turmeric powder
Salt to taste
¼ cup corn oil
½ teaspoon cumin seeds
½ teaspoon black mustard seeds
1 red dried chili
2 medium chopped onions, peeled and chopped fine
6 cloves garlic, peeled and chopped fine
½ -inch piece fresh gingerroot, peeled and chopped fine
¼ teaspoon asafoetida
2 medium tomatoes, chopped
¼ cup fresh cilantro leaves, chopped fine

Wash the lentils.  In a large pot, add water, lentils, turmeric, and salt.  Cover and boil over medium heat, stirring occasionally for 30 minutes until lentils are tender.  Heat the oil in a wok over high heat.  Add cumin, mustard seeds and red chili, stirring over medium heat until seeds start popping and chili turns a shade darker.  Add onions, garlic, and ginger, stirring occasionally until golden brown.  Add asafoetida and mix thoroughly for a few seconds.  Add lentils and tomato and mix thoroughly.  Cover and cook for 5-6 minutes.  Add cilantro leaves and serve hot with plain Basmati rice, roti or crackers.

 

FOI_AG_Front CoverFront_Cover_3_28_2016

Let’s Curry!  Share my healthy repertoire of delicious and easy-to-prepare recipes with family and friends from Feast of India: A Legacy of Recipes and Fables (1991, 2015) and India’s Unsurpassed Cuisine: The Art of Indian Curry Cooking (Editor’s Choice, 2016) at www.feastofindia.net.

 

Sweet Kernel Corn with Garlic & Spices

Healing with food, herbs, and spices is Mother Nature’s gift to us.  As a natural antibiotic, turmeric has few equals in destroying and inhibiting the growth of bacteria and other microorganisms, while helping to heal wounds and protecting against infection.  Long considered a digestive stimulant, turmeric slows the oxidation of oils and fats, etc. and helps to check the deterioration of cells and tissues in the body.

Corn Sauteed in Turmeric

Sweet Kernel Corn with Garlic & Spices (Sabzi)

Serves 6

1 14.4 oz Bird’s Eye frozen sweet kernel corn
2 tablespoons corn oil
1 medium onion, peeled and chopped fine
½-inch piece fresh gingerroot, peeled and chopped fine
4 garlic cloves, peeled and chopped fine
1 small green chili, chopped fine
½ teaspoon turmeric powder
½ teaspoon coriander powder
½ teaspoon cumin powder
Salt to taste

Heat the oil in a wok over medium heat.  Add the onion, garlic, ginger, and green chili and sauté for 3-4 minutes, stirring constantly, until golden brown.

Add the turmeric, coriander, and cumin powder and stir for 2-3 minutes.

Add the corn and salt, and stir.  Cover and simmer for 4-5 minutes, stirring occasionally, until almost tender.

Serve hot with plain basmati rice or roti, legumes, and salad.

 

FOI_AG_Front CoverFront_Cover_3_28_2016

Let’s curry!  Share my healthy repertoire of delicious and easy-to-prepare recipes with family and friends from Feast of India: A Legacy of Recipes and Fables (1991, 2015) and India’s Unsurpassed Cuisine: The Art of Indian Curry Cooking (Editor’s Choice, 2016) at www.feastofindia.net.

Cardamom-Clove Stewed Apple Dessert

This is one tasty treat for dessert lovers of all ages made with the best honey-tart apples in the United States: the delicious Jona Gold apple of New York State… and flavored with cardamom and clove!

Stewed Apple with Cardamom

Cardamom-Clove Flavored Stewed Apple (sev)

Serves 6

2 pounds Jona Gold apples
6 cups cold water
6 green cardamoms
½  teaspoon black peppercorns
1″ cinnamon stick
6 cloves
1 bay leaf
½ cup brown sugar (optional)

Remove the skin from the apples and cut into ½-inch pieces.

In a large pot, add the water, apples, cardamom, cinnamon, cloves, black pepper, bay leaf, and brown sugar.  Cover and boil over medium heat for 6-8 minutes until tender.

Cool and transfer to serving dish.  Serve in small dessert bowls topped with a scoop of vanilla ice cream or whipped cream.

 

FOI_AG_Front CoverFront_Cover_3_28_2016

Let’s Curry!  Discover and share my healthy repertoire of delicious, and easy-to-prepare recipes of diverse flavors with family and friends from Feast of India: A Legacy of Recipes and Fables (1991, 2015) and India’s Unsurpassed Cuisine: The Art of Indian Curry Cooking (Editor’s Choice, 2016) at www.feastofindia.net.

Cilantro & Turmeric-flavored Lentils

Legumes or dried beans and peas (dals) are highly nutritious and extremely rich in protein and potassium and are  part of the culinary traditions of many countries.  They are easily digested and contain enzymes, fiber, minerals, and vitamins and is an accompaniment of almost every Indian lunch.  The repertoire of dal dishes is indeed extensive, from liquid soups and thick purees, stews, fried appetizers, crispy pancakes and crepes, sauces, and chutneys to sprouted salads and delicious sweetmeats.  

Always wash legumes four or five times under cold running water prior to cooking.  Some varieties of legumes should be soaked overnight to tenderize and save cooking time.  Dal is always prepared in combination with pungent herbs and spices, such as garlic, ginger, onion, black pepper, chilies, mustard seeds, asafoetida, cumin, coriander, turmeric, fenugreek seeds, onion seeds, salt, and oil or clarified butter to enhance digestion.  The seasoning technique (baghar or tarka) is always the same.

Coriander Flavored Lentils

Delicious Turmeric Lentils with Tomato (Dal)

Serves 6

1 pound pink lentils, soaked in cold water for 10 minutes
2 quarts water
½ teaspoon turmeric powder
Salt to taste
¼ cup corn oil
½ teaspoon cumin seeds
½ teaspoon black mustard seeds
1 red dried chili
2 medium chopped onions, peeled and chopped fine
6 cloves garlic, peeled and chopped fine
½ -inch piece fresh gingerroot, peeled and chopped fine
¼ teaspoon asafoetida
2 medium tomatoes, chopped
¼ cup fresh cilantro leaves, chopped fine

Wash the lentils.  In a large pot, add water, lentils, turmeric, and salt.  Cover and boil over medium heat, stirring occasionally for 30 minutes until lentils are tender.  Heat the oil in a wok over high heat.  Add cumin, mustard seeds and red chili, stirring over medium heat until seeds start popping and chili turns a shade darker.  Add onions, garlic, and ginger, stirring occasionally until golden brown.  Add asafoetida and mix thoroughly for a few seconds.  Add lentils and tomato and mix thoroughly.  Cover and cook for 5-6 minutes.  Add cilantro leaves and serve hot with plain Basmati rice, roti or crackers.

 

FOI_AG_Front CoverFront_Cover_3_28_2016

Let’s Curry!  Discover and share a healthy repertoire of delicious, and easy-to-prepare recipes of diverse flavors with family and friends from Feast of India: A Legacy of Recipes and Fables (1991, 2015) and India’s Unsurpassed Cuisine: The Art of Indian Curry Cooking (Editor’s Choice, 2016) at www.feastofindia.net.